PRESS

Drew Paralic is that most unusual of things, a jazz pianist and composer who has released an album of originals played by others.  Having taken up the instrument too late, he says, to approach the mastery of deeply appreciated influences like Bill Evans and Thelonious Monk, Paralic instead decided to focus on writing and arranging music.  He authored or collaborated on each of the 12 tracks that make up Paralic’s new release Roll With It, Baby, and then assembled a pleasingly varied group of crack musicians for his Brooklyn-based sessions.  The results, presented in a trio or quartet format for all but two piano-only pieces, are a straightforward swinging reminder of how small-group jazz can work as both a danceable distraction and absorbing art.  A revolving group of players interprets the songs, with only bassist Elias Bailey and reed player Mike McGinnis as constants, and that variety adds another layer of musical complexity to the proceedings.--Nick DeRiso, AllAboutJazz.com

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The album features myriad styles from the composer as he brings together Swing, Modal, and Modern Jazz, and mixes it with the blues in various combinations throughout the record’s 12 pieces.  Starting out with a Swing meets New Orleans style shuffle on the song “Steps,” Paralic showcases his love for various eras of jazz, and his penchant for mixing them together in his arrangements. -- Matt Warnock, ReviewYou.com

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His arranging skills need no apology “(On the Occasion of) Wet Snow” is so melodic that I can see snow falling in the woods behind my house.  And I know something of snow. -- Brian Arsenault, The International Review of Music

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Paralic turns back the clock on "Wintertime Tunes of Drew Paralic", a congenial journey to a nostalgic past where melody ruled and subtle affability was fundamental.--Doug Simpson, Audiophile Audition (Web Magazine)

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"Steps" captures some Mingus, who was the next step in these matters, the guy even Bill and Theo could only marvel at, but more than once the distinctly ground-level intellectualism of Paul Desmond peeks out from around corners as well. -- Mark S. Tucker, Folk & Acoustic Music Review

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(Bassist Elias) Bailey is particularly effective during “(On the Occasion of) Wet Snow,” providing a Scott LaFaro-esque shading for (David) Pearl’s trickling piano lines. When (Mike) McGinnis enters on clarinet, I could almost see frost growing into the corner of my office window panes.--Nick Deriso, referring to the version of "(On the Occasion of) Wet Snow" from WINTERTIME TUNES OF DREW PARALIC